Arab League summit: The dinosaur party at which most stayed away!

Developing Just Leadership

Crescent International

Shawwal 24, 1437 2016-07-29

Daily News Analysis

by Crescent International

Arab League summits are pretty pathetic affairs. Arabian rulers talk big but there is little action. Nothing can be expected from puppets but last week’s summit in Mauritania hit new lows!

Cairo, crescent-online.net
Friday July 29, 2016, 09:49 DST

The Arab League summit in the Mauritanian capital Nouakchott fizzled out after merely six hours last Monday (July 25). There was nothing of substance—little is expected to emerge from such an irrelevant body that comprises the Arabian regimes most of which are British-installed monarchies or equally repressive military dictatorships.

It was also the most poorly attended. Of the 20 members, only six heads of State were present. The host, Mauritanian President Mohamed Ould Abdel Aziz had to be there. Others attending the so-called summit were Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir and Yemen’s fugitive ex-President Abd Rabbuh Mansour Hadi.

Bashir is on the run from the International Criminal Court (ICC) on war crime charges. He does not dare travel outside Africa or select countries in the Middle East or he might find himself in the dock in the Hague. Bashir has been bought over by the Saudis for a fistful of dollars and now sings their praises. How low can one get?

Hadi had no reason to be in Nouakchott but he was there because the Saudis harbor this fugitive from justice who cannot set foot in the country he claims to be the president of.

Who else was there? In addition to the Emir of Qatar Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani; and the Emir of Kuwait Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad al-Jaber Al Sabah, there were the following individuals: Hassan Sheikh Mohamoud, Ismail Omar Guelleh and Iklil Zanin. Does anyone know who these people are and what country they represent?

We will spare our readers the guessing game. Hassan Sheikh Mohamoud is the president of Somalia that is little more than a patchwork of warlords. Guelleh claims to be the president of Djibouti that is essentially a military base for Western imperialist forces; and Zanin is the president of the tiny island state in the Indian Ocean called Comoros.

The Arabian dictators in the Middle East do not consider these people ‘Arabs’ but they are allowed to be part of the Arab League so that its numbers can be padded up.

The Arabian rulers are like dinosaurs. They have huge bodies with protruding bellies but small heads. Naturally there is not much room for large brains in such tiny heads. And like dinosaurs, the Arabian rulers are also on their way to extinction.

Such summits are usually characterized by a lot of hot air but this time even that nonsensical exercise was dispensed with. When the mousy looking Foreign Minister of Saudi Arabia, Adel al-Jubeir called for the overthrow of President Bashar al Asad, it was greeted with hardly repressed yawns. They all know Asad is not going anywhere; instead, the Najdi Bedouins (aka the Saudis) are on their way into the dustbin of history.

The summit’s final communiqué was largely meaningless. It began by congratulating Ahmed Abul-Gheit, a former Egyptian foreign minister, on his recent appointment as league secretary-general. Was a summit necessary to congratulate him? While reaffirming the importance of the Palestinian issue, the communique stressed the need for “joint Arab action”. And what precisely does that entail? Would the Arab armies march into Palestine to liberate it? Perish the thought.

Instead, it expressed support for a French peace initiative that seeks to restart dialogue between Palestinian and Israeli negotiators with a view to reaching a final settlement. Even that is not likely since the arrogant Zionists keep expanding their illegal settlements in the West Bank and Jerusalem while the Arabian rulers keep begging them for peace.

Unlike previous summits that had called for Asad to resign, this time the Arab League communiqué merely expressed hope that “our brothers in Syria are able to reach a political solution”. This is definitely an improvement.

Under Saudi pressure, however, the communiqué said it did not accept what it called “external interference in Arab affairs by Iran.” What Arab affairs were they referring to? Well, there is Syria, Iraq and Yemen that are being attacked by Saudi-backed and financed terrorists. Iran has treaty obligations with Syria and Iraq and is helping the two countries to fight off external aggression and terrorism. As for Yemen, Iran has no military presence over there; the Saudis have and are bombing the poorest country in the region in what has been described as war crimes.

Last year, the Egyptian dictator, General Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi, the son of a Jewish mother (that makes him a Jew and therefore, legally cannot be the president of Egypt), floated the idea of a joint Arab force. It was ploy to squeeze some money out of the Saudis but it did not fly. The Nouakchott summit did not even mention it. So much for the hair-brained ideas of the dinosaurs!

END

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